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THERESA MAY hit back at the Scottish National Party’s Westminster leader Ian Blackford during a fiery Brexit exchange in the House of Commons after he demanded the UK remain in the European Union’s single market. The Prime Minister suggested her SNP

counterpart should consult Google after he demanded Mrs May “commit” to keeping the UK inside the European Union’s single market and customs union. Mr Blackford also asked for a firm commitment from Mrs May there will be no return to a hard border. Scottish

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said Scotland should be offered the same opportunity to remain attached to the EU as Northern Ireland after the Prime Minister signed a last-minute deal to begin trade talks next year. There will be no return to a hard border

between Northern Ireland and the Republic under a pledge by the UK Government to push forward Brexit trade talks. The document, signed by Mrs May, also sets out a fallback position if the UK fails to agree on a trade deal, which said there would continue to be

“full alignment” between the EU and Northern Ireland. Discussing this in the Commons, Mr Blackford said: “For the absence of any doubt can the Prime Minister tell the House

today that in no circumstance will we be returning to a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic. “Let’s make that commitment tin this House today.” The Prime Minister hit back, Mrs May blast: “He asked me to confirm in this house that there

will be no hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland. “I have to say to him this is not the first time I have made this statement in this House. He can Google it and find from Hansard how many times I have said it. “Indeed, if he listened to my statement and looked at my statement I said the joint report reaffirms our guarantee that there will be no hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland.” Replying to the SNP’s demand to keep Scotland in the EU’s single market, the Prime Minister added: “Northern Ireland is in a different position from Scotland. It is the only part of the United Kingdom which has a land border with a country that will remain in the European Union. “And it is in fact already the case that there are a number of unique, specific solutions that pertain to the island of Ireland – the common electricity market, for example.”